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Over 40 Million People Had Health Information Leaked This Year

Slashdot - 2 godziny 27 minut temu
Over 40 million people in the United States had their personal health information exposed in data breaches this year, a significant jump from 2020 and a continuation of a trend toward more and more health data hacks and leaks. The Verge reports: Health organizations are required to report any health data breaches that impact 500 or more people to the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, which makes the breaches public. So far this year, the office has received reports of 578 breaches, according to its database. That's fewer than the 599 breaches reported in 2020 (PDF), but last year's breaches only affected about 26 million people. Since 2015, hacks or other IT incidents have been the leading reason people have their health records exposed, according to a report (PDF) from security company Bitglass. Before then, lost or stolen devices led to the most data breaches.

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This Massive Planet Shouldn't Exist

Slashdot - 5 godzin 27 minut temu
fahrbot-bot shares a report from Gizmodo: Scientists have spotted an unusually large exoplanet in orbit around b Centauri, a massive two-star system that is visible to the unaided eye. With a combined weight of roughly 10 Suns, it's now the heaviest star system known to host a planet. The details of this discovery were published today in Nature. The newly discovered planet, called "b Cen (AB)b," is likely a gas giant and is heavier than 10 Jupiters combined, making it one of the most massive planets ever discovered. It orbits the b Centauri binary system, which is located 325 light-years from Earth and has a combined mass of nearly 10 Suns. At 52 billion miles from its host stars, this planet has one of the widest orbits ever detected. By comparison, Pluto orbits the Sun at around 3.3 billion miles, so yeah, that's an unbelievable separation. Until now, planets had not been found in orbit around star systems weighing more than three solar masses. Astronomers didn't think planets could form around systems like this, so it's forcing a major rethink of what's possible in terms of planetary architectures and the conditions under which planets can form. That a planet exists in this star system is indeed surprising. Young stars have protoplanetary disks around them, from which planets eventually emerge. A hot star system like b Centauri, however, is not supposed to be conducive to planetary formation, owing to tremendous amounts of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation. This high-energy radiation "tends to destroy the disks in a very short time," and it was "thought that this wouldn't give planets enough time to form in the disk before it disappeared," [said Markus Janson, an astronomer at Stockholm University and the first author of the study]. Yet there it is -- a full fledged planet around the b Centauri system. [...] A neat observation is how the ratio between the masses of the star system and its planet closely matches that of our Sun and Jupiter. But that's where the comparison ends, as the scale of b Centauri is far vaster, as the planet is 10 times the mass of Jupiter and with an orbit that's 100 times wider. [...] From an astrobiological perspective, Janson added that b Centauri is "possibly one of the worst places in the galaxy to host life." Together, the binary pair spew enormous amounts of UV and X-ray radiation, "which would sterilize any surface that is exposed to it," so "life on any surface in the system is certainly not very likely." Still, Janson did not rule out the possibility that life could exist in subterranean oceans, matching ongoing speculation about basic life existing on Jupiter's moon Europa or Saturn's moon Enceladus.

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Boss Says Sorry For 'Blundered' Zoom Firing of 900 Staff

Slashdot - 8 godzin 57 minut temu
An anonymous reader quotes a report from the BBC: The boss of a US mortgage company, who fired hundreds of his staff in a Zoom meeting has said he is "deeply sorry" for the way the lay-offs were handled. The sackings were necessary said Vishal Garg, but he accepted he had "blundered the execution" and "embarrassed" them. "I failed to show the appropriate amount of respect and appreciation for the individuals who were affected," he said in a letter (PDF) on the firm's website. Mr Garg was heavily criticized after he sacked 900 staff in an online meeting. "I am deeply sorry and am committed to learning from this situation and doing more to be the leader that you expect me to be," he said. Mr Garg said he had realized "the way I communicated this news made a difficult situation worse."

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Can an Athlete's Blood Enhance Brainpower?

Slashdot - 10 godzin 17 minut temu
fahrbot-bot shares a report from The New York Times: What if something in the blood of an athlete could boost the brainpower of someone who doesn't or can't exercise? Could a protein that gets amplified when people exercise help stave off symptoms of Alzheimer's and other memory disorders? That's the tantalizing prospect raised by a new study in which researchers injected sedentary mice with blood from mice that ran for miles on exercise wheels, and found that the sedentary mice then did better on tests of learning and memory. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, also found that the type of brain inflammation involved in Alzheimer's and other neurological disorders was reduced in sedentary mice after they received their athletic counterparts' blood. Scientific results with mice don't necessarily translate to humans. Still, experts said the study supports a growing body of research. The study involved mice that were about three months old -- roughly the equivalent of 25-to-30-year olds for humans. Some of the mice, nocturnal animals that love to run, could freely use exercise wheels in their cages and logged about four to six miles on the wheels each night. The wheels were locked for other mice that could scoot around their cages but could not get an extended cardio workout. [...] After 28 days, the researchers took a third group of mice that also did not exercise and injected them with blood plasma, the liquid that surrounds blood cells, from either the runner mice or the non-runner mice. Mice receiving runner blood did better on two tests of learning and memory than those receiving blood from the non-runner mice. In one test, which measures how long a mouse will freeze in fear when it is returned to a cage where it previously received an electric foot shock, mice with runner blood froze 25 percent longer, indicating they had better memory of the stressful event [...]. In the other test, mice with runner blood were twice as fast at finding a platform submerged in opaque water, he said. The team also found that the brains of mice with runner blood produced more of several types of brain cells, including those that generate new neurons in the hippocampus, a region involved in memory and spatial learning. A genetic analysis showed that about 1,950 genes had changed in response to the infusion of runner blood, becoming either more or less activated. Most of the 250 genes with the greatest activation changes were involved in inflammation and their changes suggested that brain inflammation was reduced.

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Suicide Pods Now Legal In Switzerland, Providing Users With a Painless Death

Slashdot - 10 godzin 57 minut temu
Switzerland is giving the green light to so-called "suicide capsules" -- 3-D printed pods that allow people to choose the place where they want to die an assisted death. Global News reports: The country's medical review board announced the legalization of the Sarco Suicide Pods this week. They can be operated by the user from the inside. Dr. Philip Nitschke, the developer of the pods and founder of Exit International, a pro-euthanasia group, told SwissInfo.ch the machines can be "towed anywhere for the death" and one of the most positive features of the capsules is that they can be transported to an "idyllic outdoor setting." Currently, assisted suicide in Switzerland means swallowing a capsule filled with a cocktail of controlled substances that puts the person into a deep coma before they die. But Sarco pods -- short for sarcophagus -- allow a person to control their death inside the pod by quickly reducing internal oxygen levels. The person intending to end their life is required to answer a set of pre-recorded questions, then press a button that floods the interior with nitrogen. The oxygen level inside is quickly reduced from 21 per cent to one per cent. After death, the pod can be used as a coffin. [...] Nitschke said his method of death is painless, and the person will feel a little bit disoriented and/or euphoric before they lose consciousness. He said there are only two capsule prototypes in existence, but a third machine is being printed now, and he expects this method to become available to the Swiss public next year.

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SF Millennium Tower Tilts Quarter Inch In Four Days

Slashdot - 11 godzin 17 minut temu
Newly released monitoring data shows that San Francisco's Millennium Tower tilted a quarter inch during the four days it took to install the first test pile to bedrock last month. From a local report: The monitoring data tracks settlement, tilting and water pressure levels underneath the sinking and leaning structure since work began on a fix for the troubled tower in May. Since work began to shore the sinking structure up on the north and west sides, the building has settled nearly 2 inches at the northwest corner and is now tilting more than two feet at that edge. The latest data -- including the four days that the test pile was installed from Nov. 15 to Nov. 19 -- shows a quarter inch of new tilt, as well as a tenth of an inch of settlement at the time the test installation occurred. At the same time, there was marked fluctuation of water pressure below the foundation on the Mission Street side of the structure. [...] Still, Ron Hamburger, the fix designer, recently assured city officials that the settlement that has occurred during testing of new methods designed to limit sinking is within expected levels. Hamburger now has city permission to install two more test piles. Hamburger told city officials the additional testing is needed to help determine just how many piles will ultimately be used to shore up the structure.

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DeepMind Tests the Limits of Large AI Language Systems With 280-Billion-Parameter Model

Slashdot - 11 godzin 37 minut temu
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Language generation is the hottest thing in AI right now, with a class of systems known as "large language models" (or LLMs) being used for everything from improving Google's search engine to creating text-based fantasy games. But these programs also have serious problems, including regurgitating sexist and racist language and failing tests of logical reasoning. One big question is: can these weaknesses be improved by simply adding more data and computing power, or are we reaching the limits of this technological paradigm? This is one of the topics that Alphabet's AI lab DeepMind is tackling in a trio of research papers published today. The company's conclusion is that scaling up these systems further should deliver plenty of improvements. "One key finding of the paper is that the progress and capabilities of large language models is still increasing. This is not an area that has plateaued," DeepMind research scientist Jack Rae told reporters in a briefing call. DeepMind, which regularly feeds its work into Google products, has probed the capabilities of this LLMs by building a language model with 280 billion parameters named Gopher. Parameters are a quick measure of a language's models size and complexity, meaning that Gopher is larger than OpenAI's GPT-3 (175 billion parameters) but not as big as some more experimental systems, like Microsoft and Nvidia's Megatron model (530 billion parameters). It's generally true in the AI world that bigger is better, with larger models usually offering higher performance. DeepMind's research confirms this trend and suggests that scaling up LLMs does offer improved performance on the most common benchmarks testing things like sentiment analysis and summarization. However, researchers also cautioned that some issues inherent to language models will need more than just data and compute to fix. "I think right now it really looks like the model can fail in variety of ways," said Rae. "Some subset of those ways are because the model just doesn't have sufficiently good comprehension of what it's reading, and I feel like, for those class of problems, we are just going to see improved performance with more data and scale." But, he added, there are "other categories of problems, like the model perpetuating stereotypical biases or the model being coaxed into giving mistruths, that [...] no one at DeepMind thinks scale will be the solution [to]." In these cases, language models will need "additional training routines" like feedback from human users, he noted.

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Virgin Media Fined $50K For Spamming Opted-Out Customers

Slashdot - 11 godzin 57 minut temu
British telco Virgin Media is facing a 50,000 pound financial penalty after spamming more than 400,000 opted-out customers urging them to sign back up to receive marketing bumf. The Register reports: Just one customer complained to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) about receiving the spam -- but that was enough to spur the regulator into investigating. In a message disguised as a routine communication about tariff prices, Virgin told the unfortunate 451,217 recipients it knew full well they'd opted out of marketing emails but wanted them to opt back in. A dischuffed customer wrote to the ICO urging action, describing the spam as "basically a service message dressed up as an attempt to get me to opt back in to marketing communications." When the ICO asked Virgin why it did this thing, the telco said the 451,000 recipients had opted out of being spammed more than a year ago, and therefore "might have changed their marketing preferences." Even though 6,500 customers decided to opt back into receiving marketing emails as a result of the mailshot, the ICO said this wasn't enough to ignore regulation 22 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003. This is the bit of the law that says email marketers must have your consent before filling your mailbox with enticing new ways to part you from your hard-earned cash. "The fact that Virgin Media had the potential for financial gain from its breach of the regulation (by signing up more clients to direct marketing) is an aggravating factor, not a defense," sniffed the unamused watchdog.

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Waking Up Right After Drifting Off To Sleep Can Boost Creativity

Slashdot - 12 godzin 17 minut temu
sciencehabit writes: When Thomas Edison hit a wall with his inventions, he would nap in an armchair while holding a steel ball. As he started to fall asleep and his muscles relaxed, the ball would strike the floor, waking him with insights into his problems. Or so the story goes. Now, more than 100 years later, scientists have repeated the trick in a lab, revealing that the famous inventor was on to something. People following his recipe tripled their chances of solving a math problem. The trick was to wake up in the transition between sleep and wakefulness, just before deep sleep. The study team also identified a brain activity pattern linked to the creativity-boosting phase: moderate levels of brain waves at a slow frequency known as alpha, associated with relaxation, and low levels of delta waves, a hallmark of deep sleep. Experts say researchers can now focus on this brain signature when investigating the neural mechanisms of creative problem-solving. One team has already planned an experiment to help people reach a creative zone by monitoring their brain waves in real time. "Edison's intuition was somewhat right," says the lead scientist, "and now we have a lot more to explore."

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Wikipedia Editors Very Mad About Jimmy Wales' NFT of a Wikipedia Edit

Slashdot - 12 godzin 57 minut temu
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales' auction of an NFT and the iMac he used to build the website has stirred up drama in the notoriously rigid Wikipedia community. The trouble began when Wales posted an announcement about the auction on his user talk page -- a kind of message board where users communicate directly with each other. Wikipedia has strict rules against self-promotion and some editors felt that Wales' announcement violated that rule. "Am I crazy? Jimbo has posted a thread on his user talk page promoting an auction of some of his stuff, which he has refused to confirm would not benefit him personally," editor Floquenbeam said on December 3.. "This is self-promotion 101, right? I've told him if he doesn't remove it, I will. That's policy, right? [...] Wales pushed back, saying he'd spoken to the WMF communications and legal departments and that they'd agreed a simple post about the auction on his user talk page would be fine. The conversation went on like this for about a day before another editor shut it down, saying it was "past the point of productive discourse." The thread announcing the auction on Wales' talk page was removed but another thread remains where he's answering questions about the auction and NFTs from other users. An email thread on the Wikimedia-L listserv is more measured but still has some pedantic arguments that is common with Wikimedia drama. Some users are concerned that he's taking something from Wikimedia and could use the money to fund his commercial enterprise WT:Social. Another user said "The concept of NFT seems to go against the very principles of Wikipedia. On one hand, we share our work freely, both in terms of access and by using a copyleft license. On the other hand, this NFT takes something that was shared freely and then restricts it so that it can be sold." The NFT Wales is selling is a website that allows users to relive the moment of Wikipedia's creation. The site looks like Wikipedia did in its fledgling moments, and whoever wins the auction can edit it as they will. The second big controversy among Wikipedia's editors was whether Wales had the right to auction off something like this and if he was even recreating the site correctly at the moment of its inception. The discussion devolved into a lengthy conversation about who owns the rights to what they edit on Wikipedia and the state of servers and timestamps from 2001. It's worth mentioning here that Wales' NFT is a recreation of a memory and not an actual editable bit of code that will be reflected on Wikipedia in any way. Eventually, all sides relented. "There is at least one good thing that should be coming out of this," editor Smallbones said. "The community has made it very clear that anything that is considered to be promotional or an advertisement, even if it is for a charitable cause, on any page in Wikipedia, posted by any editor -- even the most senior and most respected -- may be removed by any editor at any time."

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Biden Wants To Make Federal Government Carbon Neutral by 2050

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 23:50
The Biden administration announced Wednesday it aims to buy its way to a cleaner, cooler planet, spending billions to create a federal fleet of electric vehicles, upgrade federal buildings and change how the government buys electricity. From a report: The executive order President Biden signed leverages Washington's buying power to cut the government's carbon emissions 65 percent by the end of the decade. It lays out goals that would put the federal government on a path to net-zero emissions by 2050 and would add at least 10 gigawatts' worth of clean electricity to the grid. Under the new approach, federal operations would run entirely on carbon-free electricity by 2030. By 2035, the government would stop buying gas-powered vehicles, switching to zero-emission heavy-duty trucks and cars. A decade after that, most of the buildings owned or leased by the government would no longer contribute to the carbon pollution that's warming the planet. The order also instructs the government to launch a "buy clean" initiative, prioritizing products produced and transported with low greenhouse gas emissions. Sarah Bloom Raskin, a Duke University law professor who served as treasury deputy secretary under President Barack Obama, said in a recent interview that the administration's push to reduce its carbon footprint could ripple across the economy.

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Apple Won't Have To Make the App Store Changes Ordered in Epic Ruling While Case is Appealed

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 23:10
Apple will not have to implement changes to its in-app purchase system and App Store guidelines as ordered by the judge's ruling in its court battle with Epic Games. From a report: While Apple largely won that case, as the court ruled Apple was not acting as a monopolist, the company had been ordered to stop preventing app developers from adding links that pointed users to other means of paying for their in-app purchases outside the App Store. Both Apple and Epic appealed the original ruling -- Epic because it was not successful with its larger claims, and Apple because it disagreed with this aspect of the ruling over in-app purchases. Apple originally had until Dec. 9 to update its App Store policies, but had asked the court for a stay on the injunction regarding the changes to its in-app purchasing guidelines until the appeal was decided. The appeals court has now granted Apple more time before the injunction goes into effect. That means developers will have to continue to use the existing in-app purchase system Apple provides. They won't be allowed to link to or steer users to their own websites for payments from inside their apps. In a document filed today in the U.S Court of Appels for the Ninth Circuit, the court decided Apple had demonstrated "at minimum, that its appeal raises serious questions on the merits of the district court's determination that Epic Games failed to show Apple's conduct violated any antitrust laws but did show that the same conduct violated California's Unfair Competition Law."

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Alexa.com Is 'Retiring'

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 22:30
Alexa.com, the internet company that provides web traffic data, global rankings, and other information on over 30 million websites, is being retired on May 1, 2022. The announcement was brief and didn't explain what was behind the decision. The Alexa.com team writes: Twenty-five years ago, we founded Alexa Internet. After two decades of helping you find, reach, and convert your digital audience, we've made the difficult decision to retire Alexa.com on May 1, 2022. Thank you for making us your go-to resource for content research, competitive analysis, keyword research, and so much more. We have been proud to serve you as customers. [...] The company says it's "stopped offering new subscriptions on December 8, 2021," but existing subscriptions will continue to have access until May 1, 2022. The Web Information Service APIs will be retired today (December 8, 2022).

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Microsoft To Change Hiring Process After DOJ Finds Immigration-related Discrimination

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 21:51
The U.S. Justice Department said on Tuesday it reached a settlement with Microsoft resolving allegations that the company discriminated against non-U.S. citizens in its hiring process. From a report: Microsoft asked job applicants for unnecessary immigration documents to prove they could work for the company without needing its sponsorship for work visas, the department said. It said an investigation found that Microsoft discriminated against at least six lawful permanent residents based on their immigration status by asking them to show a Permanent Resident Card to prove they had permission to work without employer sponsorship. Under the settlement, Microsoft will overhaul parts of its hiring process to ensure the company is following U.S. law, which prohibits employers from asking for documents when they are not required, the Justice Department said.

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Microsoft Rolls Out Revamped Notepad App To Windows 11 Insiders

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 19:53
Microsoft is continuing to update and refine Windows 11 two months after its public release, and the Notepad app is the latest bit of the operating system to get some attention. From a report: The updated version of the Notepad app is rolling out to Windows Insiders in the Dev channel, where the company is also testing tweaks to the taskbar and Start menu, a new-old button for setting the default web browser, an updated Media Player app, and other changes. The main changes appear pretty much as they did in the leaked Notepad screenshots from early October: the new unified title bar and menu bar pick up Windows 11's "mica" styling, as well as dark-mode support, support for switching between dark and light mode, and modernized font controls.

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Instagram's Boss Faces Congress' Questions on Harm To Teens

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 19:14
The head of Instagram will find himself in Congress' crosshairs for the first time Wednesday in the one area lawmakers have shown they are willing to pass tech regulations -- protecting youngsters online. From a report: Republicans and Democrats have found common ground in grilling tech companies on how their products harm children, especially after revelations in The Wall Street Journal about Instagram's potential harm to the mental health of teen girls. Instagram head Adam Mosseri will testify before the Senate Commerce consumer protection subcommittee Wednesday on how the photo-sharing app is used by teens. Ahead of the hearing, Mosseri announced changes Instagram is making to better protect young users, including launching the Take a Break option for a user that's been scrolling for a certain amount of time and building a feature that will nudge teens toward different topics if they've been dwelling on one. The company also announced that it plans a March launch for tools parents can use to see -- and limit -- how much time their kids spend on Instagram. And Instagram in January will allow users to bulk delete posts, including photos, videos, previous likes and comments. At the hearing, expect Mosseri to emphasize Instagram's commitment to sharing data with researchers, as well as the company's support for some regulations around verifying the age of users and designing age-appropriate experiences. Instagram's parent-company Meta has criticized the Wall Street Journal's reporting, arguing that it mischaracterized the Instagram research and that most teens suffering from issues such as sadness or anxiety find Instagram helpful.

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Your Face Is, or Will Be, Your Boarding Pass

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 18:31
Tech-driven changes are coming fast and furiously to airports, including advancements in biometrics that verify identity and shorten security procedures for those passengers who opt into the programs. From a report: If it's been a year or more since you traveled, particularly internationally, you may notice something different at airports in the United States: More steps -- from checking a bag to clearing customs -- are being automated using biometrics. Biometrics are unique individual traits, such as fingerprints, that can be used to automate and verify identity. They promise both more security and efficiency in moving travelers through an airport where, at steps from check-in to boarding, passengers are normally required to show government-issued photo identification. In the travel hiatus caused by the pandemic, many airports, airlines, tech companies and government agencies like the Transportation Security Administration and United States Customs and Border Protection continued to invest in biometric advancements. The need for social distancing and contactless interactions only added to the urgency. "The technologies have gotten much more sophisticated and the accuracy rate much higher," said Robert Tappan, the managing director for the trade group International Biometrics + Identity Association, who called the impetus to ease crowds and reduce contact through these instruments "COVID-accelerated." Many of the latest biometric developments use facial recognition, which the National Institute of Standards and Technology recently found is at least 99.5 percent accurate, rather than iris-scanning or fingerprints. "Iris-scanning has been touted as the most foolproof," said Sherry Stein, the head of technology in the Americas for SITA, a Switzerland-based biometrics tech company. "For biometrics to work, you have to be able to match to a known trusted source of data because you're trying to compare it to a record on file. The face is the easiest because all the documents we use that prove your identity -- driver's licenses, passports etc. -- rely on face." Shortly after 9/11, Congress mandated an entry and exit system using biometric technology to secure U.S. borders. Some travelers have expressed concerns about privacy, and while companies and agencies using the technology say they do not retain the images, the systems largely rely on willing travelers who agree to their use.

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Roku, Google Settle Messy Battle Over YouTube Distribution

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 18:04
Roku and Google have agreed to a multi-year extension for both YouTube and YouTube TV apps to be distributed on Roku. From a report: Roku's deal with Google to distribute YouTube was set to expire this month. Without a deal, YouTube would've been removed from Roku's channel store, creating a big competitive disadvantage, especially during the holiday season. "Roku and Google have agreed to a multi-year extension for both YouTube and YouTube TV," a Roku spokesperson said. "This agreement represents a positive development for our shared customers, making both YouTube and YouTube TV available for all streamers on the Roku platform."

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'Decentralization Illusion': Central Bank Group Urges Regulation of DeFi Crypto Platforms

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 17:00
The central bank of central banks is worried about "decentralized finance." From a report: The Bank for International Settlements, an umbrella group for central banks, said in a report this week that it's concerned there's a "decentralization illusion" in DeFi. DeFi is a rapidly-growing part of the cryptocurrency market that promises to deliver traditional financial products like loans and savings accounts without involvement from regulated middlemen such as banks. But regulators are increasingly concerned about platforms offering DeFi services that may not be as "decentralized" as advertised. "What we found is that, first, the decentralized aspect tends to be illusive," Agustin Carstens, general manager of the BIS, told CNBC's Julianna Tatelbaum Tuesday. "There are some incentive issues related to the fact that, through this decentralization, at some point you end up with some agents that play an important role, and not necessarily for the best [interests] of users of financial services." The central bank group did not mention any specific names related to its concerns.

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Older People Who Get Cataracts Removed Have Lower Dementia Risk

Slashdot - Śro, 2021-12-08 16:20
Older people who have cataract surgery to improve their eyesight are less likely to develop dementia afterwards. From a report: The effect could be because people who lose their eyesight typically spend more time at home, and so get less mental stimulation -- or it could be down to a strange effect that cataracts have on the colours that reach the retina at the back of the eye. Cataracts, which involve the lens of the eye becoming more cloudy with age, are one of the most common causes of vision loss in older people. They can be fixed by surgically removing the lens to replace it with a plastic one. Sight loss was already known to be a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. Cecilia Lee at the University of Washington in Seattle wondered whether cataract surgery would have a noticeable correlation with dementia incidence.

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